Roots66

kvanm:

The house was at 2078 Fifth Avenue in Harlem, New York. It was March of 1947, and someone had made an anonymous phone call reporting a dead body there. Two recluse brothers in their 60s, Homer and Langley Collyer, were living at the address—the same one where they grew up with their wealthy parents. For the last three years, though, Homer stopped emerging from the house completely, having been blinded as a result of a stroke. Langley only left after midnight once a week to collect food. (He fed Homer a diet of 100 oranges a week, black bread and peanut butter, a self-devised combination that he was convinced would help his brother regain his vision).

Kids threw rocks at the windows, and eventually instead of replacing them, the brothers boarded up every window completely. Electricity, gas and water had been cut off for almost two decades, and the brothers used a kerosene lamp for heat.

When authorities showed up to investigate the dead body, they found themselves in a place where time stood still, where there was neither night nor day, and where two men managed to fill every square inch with over 25,000 books, 14 pianos (both grand and upright), hundreds of yards of unused silk and fabric, half a dozen toy train sets, the folding top of a horse carriage, an armory of weapons and other miscellaneous junk. 100 tons of it, to be exact—about a third of the weight of a Boeing 747. Convinced that Homer would one day see again, Langley had been saving every single newspaper that was published, daily for three years straight, so that his brother would read the news he had missed.

After hours of making their way through the labyrinth of debris, police found the dead body. It was Homer’s. He had died of starvation and dehydration. Apparently Langley had stopped bringing him his oranges. But where was Langley, everyone asked. He was missing. A massive, three-week search was launched, reaching as far as Atlantic City. Then, one day, in the process of clearing the seemingly endless amount of junk, Langley finally showed—squashed under one of his own booby traps and gnawed on by rats—just a few feet away from his brother. He had died first, and without a caretaker, Homer soon followed. (Strangetopia)

Further Reading:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collyer_brothers#Homer_Collyer.27s_death

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/10/26/nyregion/the-paper-chase.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

superblackmarket:

Stiv Bators outside Bomp Records photographed by Chuck Krall, 1977

superblackmarket:

Stiv Bators outside Bomp Records photographed by Chuck Krall, 1977

beatlesology:

Teddy Boy Ringo

Beer-guzzlin’ Signed D.C./Roots66 digs the 5.6.7.8’s at Coney Island High, circa 1998.  Thanks to Jen S. for posting this at the CIH FB page.

Beer-guzzlin’ Signed D.C./Roots66 digs the 5.6.7.8’s at Coney Island High, circa 1998.  Thanks to Jen S. for posting this at the CIH FB page.


Pete Townshend, 5th Dimension Club. June 1967.

Pete Townshend, 5th Dimension Club. June 1967.

midcenturymodernfreak:

1970s Future…from 1961
TV viewers of the 1970s will see their programs on sets quite different from today’s, if designs now being worked out are developed. At the Home Furnishings Market in Chicago, Illinois, on June 21, 1961, a thin TV screen is a feature of this design model. Another feature is an automatic timing device which would record TV programs during the viewers’ absence to be played back later. The 32x22-inch color screen is four inches thick. (AP Photo/Edward Kitch) - Via

midcenturymodernfreak:

1970s Future…from 1961

TV viewers of the 1970s will see their programs on sets quite different from today’s, if designs now being worked out are developed. At the Home Furnishings Market in Chicago, Illinois, on June 21, 1961, a thin TV screen is a feature of this design model. Another feature is an automatic timing device which would record TV programs during the viewers’ absence to be played back later. The 32x22-inch color screen is four inches thick. (AP Photo/Edward Kitch) - Via

midcenturymodernfreak:

Vintage Clickers! (or rotary!)

Via: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7